Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a technique that stimulates biological functions based on stimulating points on the body surface (Acupoints)

Acupuncture points are defined as surface body points with “High electrical conductance”. They are composed of points of fascial defects where a neuro-vascular-lymphatic bundle from the superficial tissues drains into their deep tributaries through the fascial layers

The WHO has found 43 acupuncture points that have “Therapeutic values”. Stimulation of these points can be achieved via: Mechanical (Needle, massage, air, ultrasound), Light (Laser, Infra-red), Heat (Heating pads) or Electrical (Microcurrents, TENS) methods

In 2002, Helen M. Langevin, M.D., has shown that acupuncture meridians are actually the “Fascial planes” of the body. Fascial planes are a route for electrons transport in the body, and most of teeth are connected to fascial planes (Meridians) connected to deep organs according to the Traditional Chinese Medicine

Acupuncture points are defined as surface body points with “High electrical conductance”. They are composed of points of fascial defects where a neuro-vascular-lymphatic bundle from the superficial tissues drains into their deep tributaries through the fascial layers

According to Dr. Jerry Tennant’s teachings, the body is wired together via the acupuncture meridians. When voltage in any meridian is reduced, the organs attached to this fascial plane suffer. The fascial planes can be considered as a fiber-optic cables connecting internet/electricity to different homes and places in a city (The body). Since voltage can be delivered via the fascial planes to the internal organs, then you can heal internal organs via supplying voltage through acupuncture points

According to the Chinese medicine teachings, the internal body imbalances arises from disturbed Electrical energy (Chi) between the Sympathetic (Yang) and Parasympathetic (Yin) autonomic systems. Balance to the system is applied by stimulating direct current flow within the fascial planes (Meridian) via specific points (Acupuncture points), which will re-balance the blocked electrical energy (Chi) flow within the system

The electrical flow according to the Chinese medicine teaching flows in fascial channels (Meridians) that intersects many internal solid and hollow organs. Therefore, these channels are named according to these internal organs that they intersect 

The acupuncture (fascial) meridians are:

1. The Lung meridian (Lu; Parasympathetic): from the thumb to the upper part of the chest; contains 11 points

2. The Large intestine meridian (Li; Sympathetic): from the index running in the neck to the nose; contains 20 points

3. The Stomach meridian (St; Sympathetic): from the corner of the eye to the 2nd toenail; contains 44 points

4. The Spleen meridian (Sp; Parasympathetic): from the big toe to the upper chest; contains 21 points

5. The Heart meridian (H; Parasympathetic): from the armpit to the little finger; contains 9 points

6. The Small intestine meridian (Si; Sympathetic): from the little finger to the ear through the face; contains 19 points

7. The Urinary bladder meridian (B; Sympathetic): from the corner of the eye to the little toe passing through the forehead & the back and leg; contains 67 points

8. The Kidney meridian (K; Parasympathetic): from the corner of the sole of the foot to the chest below the clavicle; contains 27 points

9. The Pericardium meridian (PC; Parasympathetic): from the chest to the middle finger; contains 9 points

10. The Triple Warmer meridian (Tw; Sympathetic): from the 4th fingernail to the eyebrow via the head & neck; contains 23 points

11. The Gallbladder meridian (Gb; Sympathetic): from the side of the eye to the 4th toenail passing via the head, chest, torso & leg; contains 44 points

12. The Liver meridian (Liv; Parasympathetic): from the big toe to the nipple; contains 14 points

13. The Governing vessel meridian (Gv; Sympathetic): from anterior to the anus to inside the mouth passing through the spine and the scalp; contains 28 points)

14. The Conceptual vessel meridian (Cv; Parasympathetic): from anterior to the anus to inside the mouth passing through the abdomen & chest; contains 24 points

The energy (Chi) within each meridian circulates for 2 hours. Since we have 12 meridians, multiplied by 2 hours each, then the energy circulate in full within 24 hours. They are arranged as the following:

1-3 a.m. = Liver meridian

3-5 a.m. = Lung meridian

5-7 a.m. = Large intestine meridian

7-9 a.m. = Stomach meridian

9-11 a.m. = Spleen meridian

11 a.m. – 1 p.m. = Heart meridian

1-3 p.m. = Small intestine meridian

3-5 p.m. = Bladder meridian

5-7 p.m. = Kidney meridian

7-9 p.m. = Pericardium meridian

9-11 p.m. = Triple warmer meridian

11 p.m. – 1 a.m. = Gallbladder meridian

Nakatani acupuncture system

(Ryodokaru)

Ryodoraku is a Japanese word that means (Ryo = good; Do = electro-conductive; Raku = line). The word describes a pathological phenomenon, where a line of a “High electro-conductivity” is detected on the skin when an inflamed visceral organ is found within the body; this skin line is matches the Chinese meridians, and is explained by a “Viscero-sympathtic reflex” agitation

This phenomenon was described by Yosio Nakatani in 1950, and Nakatani has created a set of Meridian lines that originate from the hand (H), foot (F), and heart (H); all of which transect or stationed finally into a visceral organ. The heart meridian (H3) refers to the “Circulatory system”, and the triple warmer (H5) refers to the “Lymphatic / autonomic system

Natanaki devices are used to diagnose organ pathologies based on the use of electrical voltage in the Natanaki points. The device gives a number that is double the voltage (e.g., if the measured voltage is 30, then it is 15 in reality). However, the device doesn’t differentiate if the voltage measured is positive or negative

You can use the Natanaki system for diagnosis. For example, in diabetics, you can find low voltage in the spleen/pancreas meridian (Degeneration) and high voltage in the liver meridian (Inflammationsteatosis)  

 

Selected references

1. Walther DS. Applied kinesiolgy synopsis. 1988; Triad of Health Publishing; 2nd edition

http://www.amazon.com/Applied-Kinesiology-Synopsis-David-Walther/dp/0929721047/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1439365164&sr=8-1&keywords=applied+kinesiology+synopsis

2. Tennant J. Healing is voltage; the handbook. 2010; CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; 3rd edition

http://www.amazon.com/Healing-Voltage-Handbook-Jerry-Tennant/dp/1453649166/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1439365293&sr=8-1&keywords=healing+is+voltage

3. Dorsher PT et al. Acupuncture for chronic pain. Techniques in Regional Anesthesia and Pain Management 2011; 15, 55-63

4. Manni L et al. Neurotrophins and acupuncture. Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical 2010; 157: 9–17

5. Zhao ZQ. Neural mechanism underlying acupuncture analgesia. Progress in Neurobiology 2008; 85: 355–375 

6. Chang S. The meridian system and mechanism of acupuncture - A comparative review. Part 1: The meridian system. Taiwanese Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology 2012; 51: 506-514

7. Chang S. The meridian system and mechanism of acupuncture - A comparative review. Part 2: Mechanism of acupuncture analgesia. Taiwanese Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology 2013; 52: 14-24