Biotoxins & Albumin toxicity

Chronic illness is not caused by the presence of pathogens themselves but by their metabolic activity and the creation of potent “Biotoxins”. The return to health is determined by appropriate immune reactions and the body’s own ability to remove biotoxins, which can be enhanced in two key ways: (1) nutritional support to restore the detoxification capacity or/ and upregulate the metabolic enzymes of the biotoxin pathway; and (2) reducing the easier-to-control harmful exposures

Biotoxins are minute molecules (200–1000 kilodaltons) containing nitrogen and sulfur. They belong to a group of chemical messengers that microorganisms use to control the host’s immune system, host’s behavior, and even the host’s eating habits

Biotoxin exposures are diverse. They include tetanus toxin; botulinum toxin (Botox); ascaridin from intestinal parasites; streptolysin toxins from Streptococci; and toxins from Staphylococci. Aggressive staphylococcus infections that cause tissue necrosis are caused by at least three potent biotoxins, not by the presence of the microbes themselves. The diversity of the biotoxins may be profound. For example Candida albicans produces 600 different known biotoxins

Albumin is the major plasma protein and is synthesized and secreted by the “Liver”. It has a biological half-life in plasma of about (20 days) and it accounts for about 50% of the total hepatic protein production. Albumin makes the biggest contribution to the plasma oncotic pressure. If the albumin concentration falls very low, edema is the result. There are 4 main reasons for the occurrence of a low plasma albumin concentration: (1) Abnormal distribution (increased capillary permeability); (2) Decreased synthesis (e.g., liver disease); (3) Dilution (e.g., malnutrition); and (4) Abnormal excretion or Degradation (e.g., nephrotic syndrome)

Albumin toxicity is the source of most of the poisonous products of metabolism by undergoing poisonous change (Toxalbumin / Carbonylation) or by decomposition (Putrefaction), generating acids or alkaloids (Generated partially in the intestinal canal). Examples of albumin-derivative toxins include:    

1. Guanidine (CH5N3): causes epilepsy

2. Phenols (C6H5OH): produced under normal conditions by the intestinal flora. They irritate the neurons causing pain 

3. Phenyl-acetic acid (C6H5CH2COOH): poisonous substance results from putrefaction of albumin

4. Para-oxyphenyl-acetic acid (C6H4OH.CH2COOH): poisonous substance results from putrefaction of albumin; passes in the urine unchanged

5. Phenyl-propionic acid (C6H4C2H4COOH): poisonous substance results from putrefaction of albumin; passes in the urine as “Hippuric acid

6. Indol (C8H7N): poisonous substance results from putrefaction of albumin in the intestine; passes in the urine as “Sulfuric acid indoxyl ester” 

7. Methyl-indol / Scatol (C8H6CH3N): poisonous substance results from putrefaction of albumin in the intestine; passes in the urine as “Sulfuric acid scatoxyl ester

 

Selected references

1. O'Brien PJ et al. Endogenous Toxins: Targets for Disease Treatment and Prevention. 2009; Wiley-VCH; 1st edition

http://www.amazon.com/Endogenous-Toxins-Targets-Treatment-Prevention/dp/3527323635/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1439310305&sr=1-1&keywords=Endogenous+Toxins+Diet%2C+Genetics%2C+Disease+and+Treatment

2 Wang X et al. Endotoxins: Structure, Function and Recognition. 2010; Springer-Verlag; 1st edition

http://www.amazon.com/Endotoxins-Structure-Recognition-Subcellular-Biochemistry/dp/9048190770/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1439310414&sr=1-1&keywords=Endotoxins%3A+Structure%2C+Function+and+Recognition